Type de Publication Article
    Titre The most frequent adult lenght of life in the eighteenth century: the experience of the French-Canadians
    Auteurs Ouellette N. | Robine J-M. | Bourbeau R. | Desjardins B.
    Revue Population
    Résumé The modal age at death is a specific indicator of the "normal" duration of life: this is the age at which deaths are the most numerous. Today, deaths are concentrated at older ages in low-mortality populations. In past populations, deaths were more numerous in the first year of life and at adult ages, they were much less concentrated than today. The authors use a comprehensive database, the former Population Register of Quebec, to estimate the evolution of the modal age in the second half of the eighteenth century. They show an increase of nearly three years for men as for women, never observed also for older people, and offer an explanation based on the increase at this time of the proportion of the population living outside cities.
    Pages 683-709
    Volume 67
    Numéro 4
    Mots clés LIFE SPAN | FRANCE | CANADA | ORIGINAL CALCULATION | TRENDS
    Année 2012
    Url http://www.cairn.info/resume.php?ID_ARTICLE=POPU_1
    Electronic resource num DOI : 10317/popu.1204.0683

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